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Articles

English Modal Auxiliary Verbs:

 

(A Book By Manik Joshi)

 

"English Modal Auxiliary Verbs:
May, Might, Can, Could, Will, Would, 

Shall, Should, Must, Need"

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[Series Name: 'English Daily Use' | Book No: 20]

 

 

This Book Covers The Following Topics:

 

What are “Modal Auxiliary Verbs”?
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- May and Might
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘May’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘May’ -- 02
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘May’ -- 03
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘May’ -- 04
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Might’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Might’ -- 02
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Might’ -- 03
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Might’ -- 04
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- Can and Could
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Can’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Can’ -- 02
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Could’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Could’ -- 02
Use of ‘Can’t/Couldn’t Help’
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- Will and Would
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Will’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Will’ -- 02
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Will’ -- 03
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Would’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Would’ -- 02
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Would’ -- 03
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Would’ -- 04
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- Shall and Should
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Shall’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Should’ -- 01
Use of Modal Auxiliary ‘Should’ -- 02
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- Must
Use of ‘Must’ -- 01
Use of ‘Must’ -- 02
Use of ‘Must’ -- 03 -- Event Occurring Definitely In Present
Use of ‘Must’ -- 04 -- Event Occurring Definitely In Past
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- ‘Need’
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- ‘Used (to)’
Modal Auxiliary Verb -- ‘Ought (to)’
Modal Auxiliary Verb – ‘Dare’
Exercises: 1(A) and 1(B)
Exercises: 2(A) and 2(B)

 

Sample This:

 

What are Modal Verbs

 

Modal Auxiliary Verb (or ‘Modal Verb’ or ‘Modal Auxiliary’) is a verb that is used with another verb (not a modal verb) to express ability, intention, necessity, obligation, opinion, permission, possibility, probability, prohibition, and speculation etc.

 

There are 24 auxiliary verbs in English language. Out of them, 13 are modal auxiliary verbs.

 

Modal Auxiliary Verbs In English Language Are As Follows:

[Negative forms have also been given along with their contractions.]

1. May -- may not [or mayn’t (rarely used)]

2. Might -- might not [or mightn’t (rarely used)]

3. Can -- can not or cannot [can’t]

4. Could -- could not [or couldn’t]

5. Will -- will not [or won’t]

6. Would -- would not [or wouldn’t]

7. Shall -- shall not [or shan’t]

8. Should -- should not [or shouldn’t]

9. Must -- must not [or mustn’t]

10. Need -- need not [or needn’t]

11. Used to -- didn’t use to [or used not to or usedn’t to (these forms are old fashioned)]

12. Ought to -- ought not to [or oughtn’t to]

13. Dare -- Dare Not [or Daren’t]

 

Note: Other 11 auxiliary verbs are as follows:

Forms of ‘BE’ - Is, Am, Are, Was, Were,

Forms of ‘DO’ - Do, Does, Did,

Forms of ‘HAVE’ - Have, Has, Had  

 

 

Modal Auxiliary Verbs - May and Might

 

‘May’ and ‘Might’ are used to show Possibility and Probability

‘May’ and ‘Might’ are used to ask for Permission

‘May’ is used to give or refuse Permission

 

Some Important Uses of ‘May’ and ‘Might’

 

To say what the purpose of something is

We eat that we may live.

Her prayer was that the child might live.

That he might be well fed his mother starved herself.

 

To admit that something is true before introducing another point, argument, etc.

You may not return to past glory, but don't stop believing.

City may not have the roads to drive sports car, but it has excellent infrastructure.

It may not be wise, but using force may be lawful.

I may not have deserved the house I bought, but I'm glad I own it.

He may not have been loved, but he was respected.

We may have had to go without food, but he is very considerate.

 

‘May’ is used to express wishes and hopes

May you live prosperous life!

 

‘May’ is used to give or refuse Permission [In Informal and Polite Way]

You may contact us for queries regarding donations.

When you have finished your work you may go home.

Note: Never use ‘might’ to give permission. [Always use ‘may’]

Never use ‘might not’ to refuse permission. [Always use ‘may not’]

 

Difference between ‘May’ and ‘Might’

Note: ‘Might’ is the past equivalent of ‘may’ in indirect speech.

But it is used in the same way as ‘may’ to talk about the present or future.

 

‘May’ denotes more possibility/probability

‘Might’ denotes less possibility/probability

It may rain tomorrow (Perhaps a 75% chance) - More possible

It might rain tomorrow (Perhaps a 50% chance) - Less possible

 

‘Might’ also denotes ‘would perhaps’

You might attract President’s attention later. (= Perhaps you would attract.)

He might have to go (Perhaps he had to go.)

 

‘Might’ is frequently used In conditional sentences

If I pursued studies further, I might learn more.

If I had pursued studies further, I might have learned more.

 

‘Might’ has limitations while ‘asking permission’

‘Might’ is very polite and formal. It is not common. It is mostly used in indirect questions.

I wonder if I might work on your computer.

 

Note: ‘Maybe’ is an adverb. [‘Maybe’ means ‘perhaps’]

Maybe he came to know something secret and was removed from the post.

 

ALSO NOTE:

Difference Between ‘May’ and ‘Can’

‘May’ is more formal than ‘Can’

‘May’ is mostly used in ‘formal’ English.

‘Can’ is mostly used in ‘informal’ (or spoken) English

 

END OF THE SAMPLE

 

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[Series Name: 'English Daily Use' | Book No: 20]

 


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