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Articles

Interchange of Active and Passive Voice

 

(A Book By Manik Joshi)

 

"Interchange of Active and Passive Voice:
Patterns and Examples"

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[Series Name: 'English Daily Use' | Book No: 12]

 

 

This Book Covers The Following Topics:

 

Active and Passive Voice
Interchange of Active and Passive Voice
1. First or Second Form of Verb
2. Auxiliary Verb ‘Be’ + -ING Form of Verb
3. Have/Has/Had + Past Participle
4. Present/Future Modals + Verb Word
5. Past Modals + Past Participle
6. Verb + Preposition
7. Main Verb + Object + Complement
8. Main Verb + Object + Object
9. Have/Has/Had + Infinitive (To + Verb)
10. Auxiliary Verb ‘Be’ + Infinitive (To + Verb)
11. Verb + Object + Infinitive (Without ‘To’)
12. There + Verb ‘Be’ + Noun + Infinitive
13. Interrogative Sentences
14. Imperative Sentences
15. Principal Clause + That + Noun Clause (Object)
16. Verb followed by --ING form or an Infinitive
17. Use of Prepositions
18. The Passive With Get
19. Middle Voice
Exercise -- 01
Exercise -- 02
Exercise -- 03

 

Sample This:

 

 

Active and Passive Voice

 

VOICE - Definition

Voice refers to the form of a verb that shows whether the subject of a sentence performs the action or is affected by it.

 

ACTIVE VOICE - Definition

The form of a verb in which subject is the person or thing that performs the action.

In an active voice sentence, the subject acts on the object.

The active voice emphasizes the actor (the doer of the action).

Active voice is the direct writing, which means the subject does the verb’s action.

 

Example:

They finished the work.

[subject -- “they”, verb -- “finished”, object -- “work”]

In this sentence, the subject (they) acts on the object (work).

 

Other Examples:

The teacher praises him.

She posted the letter.

I buy new books.

We will celebrate his birthday.

They proposed changes to the social system.

 

PASSIVE VOICE - Definition

The form of a verb in which subject is affected by the action of the verb.

In other words, the form of a verb in which subject of the sentence has an action done to it by someone or something else.

In passive voice the subject is acted upon.

The passive voice emphasizes the receiver of the action.

Passive voice is the indirect writing style, which means the subject receives the verb’s action.

Important Note -- The object of the active voice becomes the subject in the passive voice.

 

Example:

The work was finished by them.

[subject -- “work”, passive verb -- “was finished”, object -- “them”]

In this example, the subject (work) is not the doer; it is being acted upon by the doer ‘them’)

 

Other Examples:

He is praised by the teacher.

The letter was posted by her

New books are bought by me.

His birthday will be celebrated by us.

Changes have been proposed to the social system by them.

 

 

WHEN TO USE PASSIVE VOICE

 

It is generally advised to use the passive voice sparingly because use of the active voice makes your writing direct, clearer, concise, explicit, more natural and vibrant. A sentence in active voice flows more smoothly. It is easier to understand than the same sentence in passive voice. However, using passive voice is preferred in the following situations:

 

(1). You should use passive voice when you do not know the active subject.

 

(2). You should use passive voice when active subject is not important and you want to make the active object more important.

 

(3). You should use passive voice when active subject is obvious.

 

(4). You should use passive voice when you want to emphasize the action of the sentence rather than the doer of the action.

 

(5). The passive is frequently used to describe scientific or mechanical processes to avoid the personal pronoun.

 

(6). The passive is often used in news reports:

 

(7). Sometimes, the sentence in the active voice does not sound good. And we use only the passive voice when speaking or writing:

 

(8). You can use passive voice when you want to make more polite or formal statements.

 

(9). You can use passive voice to avoid responsibility.

 

(10). You can also use passive voice for sentence variety in your writing.

 

(11). You can also use passive voice when you want to avoid extra-long subjects.

 

 

NOTE:

Avoid shifting from active to passive voice or passive to active voice in the same sentence because it can cause awkwardness and confusion.

 

CORRECT: I played football, and my friend watched movie. (consistency of active voices)

 

CORRECT: Football was played by me, and movie was watched by my friend. (consistency of passive voices)

 

INCORRECT: I played football, and movie was watched by my friend. (shifting of voices from active to passive)

 

INCORRECT: Football was played by me, and my friend watched movie. (shifting of voices from passive to active)

 

 

 

Changing Active Voice Into Passive Voice

 

Rule 1:

 

Move the object of the active voice into the position of subject (front of the sentence) in the passive voice. And move the subject of the active voice into the position of object in the passive voice.

Active -- They study grammar. [subject -- they; object -- grammar]

Passive -- Grammar is studied by them.

 

Rule 2:

Passive voice needs a helping verb to express the action. Put the helping verb in the same tense as the original active sentence. The main verb of the active voice is always changed into past participle (third form of verb) in different ways:

 

Rule 3:

Place the active sentence's subject into a phrase beginning with the preposition ‘by’

 

Rule 4:

If the object in an active voice sentence is a pronoun (me, us, you, him, her, they, it), it changes in passive voice sentence as follows:

me -- I; us -- we; you -- you; him -- he; her -- she; them -- they; it -- it

 

Rule 5:

Subject- Verb Agreement

Make the first verb agree with the new subject in passive voice.

Active -- He threw the balls. [subject of active voice -- He, verb -- threw]

Passive -- The balls were thrown by him. [subject of passive voice -- balls; first verb -- were]

 

END OF THE SAMPLE

 

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[Series Name: 'English Daily Use' | Book No: 12]

 


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